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Search Results 0 to 34 of about 35 (some duplicates have been removed)
of mexico has reached hurricane status and karen brown has the very latest. >> here in new orleans we are already starting to feel the effects of isaac, we have had a pretty strong rain coming through and right now we are in a bit of a break thankfully, the red cross has set up shelters all the way from florida to texas, that is how massive the storm is. they expect a storm surge of up to 12 ft. here, the biggest concern in new orleans is flooding. police are patrolling the nearly deserted streets of new orleans historic french quarter. homes and businesses are boarded up, sandbags are stacked and tens of thousands of gulf coast residents are getting out of town before is the kits. it is expected late tonight or early tomorrow on this seventh anniversary of hurricane katrina. this man and his family decided to evacuate this morning. >> we did not want to stay and let the train happen again. >> the massive storm is officially a hurricane pecking at least 75 m.p.h. winds along with six to 12 ft. storm surges and up to 20 in. of rain in some places. new orleans is not under a mandatory e
a hurricane sometime tomorrow karen brown in key largo florida and shows us what happened there. >>> meteorologist said is that intensifies as it heads towards the gulf coast mandatory evacuations in place in low- lying parts of alabama florida and mississippi. it is called right now a category nine. fierce winds whipped through the florida keys. i sex torrential rains caused flooding in parts of florida by sunday afternoon the dolphins were back out swimming and carol anderson to down her storm shutters >>> you dunstable >>> yes we did >>> officials here said 20,000 visitors left ahead of the storm. the expected be up and running for the labor day weekend. it could strengthen to a category 2 hurricane and make landfall among northern gulf coast louisiana governor declared a state of the emergency low-lying areas are being evacuated. new orleans on high alert. >>> we have learn to be prepared for the unexpected caution the better part of wisdom in these regards >>> hurricane warning stretch from florida panhandle to louisiana. in alabama people are boarding up their homes >>> wh
of flights cancelled as the storm marches toward gulf of mexico. karen brown is in key largo florida with the latest >>> is it racing towards the northern part of the gulf coast mayor of new orleans told residents to be on high alert and get prepared now. in key largo they breathed a sigh of relief they feel they dodge a bullet. >>> is it bring 60 mile per hour wins rain and rough surf to the florida keys in key largo some people not let the storm ruin their weekends. he gathered friends for a party >>> would put the shutters up >>> they're not taking chances they will come up early to head home >>> you guys just get married and getting out of town the newlyweds refuse to let their storm ruin their beachside wedding. >>> we saw a with the weather would be like we told everybody to get out and head out >>> in key largo that the latch down boats behind the building to protect them 23,000 visitors heeded warnings and voluntarily left the keys. is it expects to gain strength over gulf of mexico and become category 2 hurricane and make land fall between the florida panhandle and louisiana
and ranchers. you know better than anyone what severe drought does to drops and livestock. karen brown got a first hand look from a hard hit cattle rancher in arkansas. >>> bill pruitt has been raising cattle with love and pride for years. >> every day, it's like a grandchild basically. >> which is why it's breaking his heart to see them go. >> you used to have how many? >> 234. >> 234. and how many do you have left? >> i've got 112. >> the drought has killed the grass and forced pruitt to start using up expensive winter hay. so he's selling off cattle. >> it's just a hard feeling. but you know that they'll be better off down the road where there's going to be plenty of grass for them. >> at the arkansas cattle auction, it's a buyer's market. owner randy goodman is selling more than twice as many cows as usual. and they're going for a third less than the normal price. >> a lot of the cattle has went to slaughter. that's sad. >> the lucky ones find homes in other states. gerald knapp drove 260 miles from oklahoma. when he waves his card, it means he's bidding. >> did you just buy a cow? >>
in tucson. the question of his competency must be answeredder. here is karen brown this arizona with the latest for wjz. >> reporter: jared loughner is expected to plead guilty to killing six people and injuring 13 others including former congress woman gabrielle gifford it is shootings took place at a tucson shopping center, january 2011 but first, loughners attorneys must convince the judge he is mentally competent to understand the charges against him. >> i am sure the judge will talk to mr. loughner ask him some questions engage in some dialogue so that the judge is convinced he does understand, what is going on. >> the same judge said last year loughner was mentally unfit, to stand trial. loughner's lawyers are now hoping he will be sentenced to life in prison, instead of receiving the death penalty. survivors of the shooting say the most important outcome for them is that jared loughner is off the streets forever. they plan on being in court today, but gabby giffords will not be among them. her husband, former astronaut, mark kellye released a statement saying, we don't sp
of hurricane katrina. communities from florida to louisiana prepare for the impact. reporter karen brown in key largo florida >>> right now buys it intensifies as it heads towards the gulf mandatory evacuation orders in place in low-lying areas of florida and alabama and louisiana. they are starting to clean up locals call the storm category none. fierce winds whipped through the keeps knocking down trees, while isaacs' rains caused flooding in south florida by sunday afternoon the dolphins are back out swimming and carol anderson takes down her storm shutters >>> not as bad as i thought >>> and you dodged a bullet >>> yes i did >>> officials say 23,000 visitors last ahead of the storm but they expect to beat up and running for labor day weekend >>> eyes against northwest and forecasters say it could strengthen to category 2 hurricane and make landfall among the northern gulf course louisiana governor declared state of emergency low-lying areas our evacuating his new orleans on high alert. >>> we have learned to be prepared for the unexpected and caution the better part of wisdom. >>> hurricane
, and that storm is dumping more rain on areas that are already under water. karen brown is in laplace, louisiana. >> reporter: a flash flood emergency has been declared in slidell outside of new orleans. 50 people had to be rescued from their flooded homes yesterday. today entire neighborhoods are being evacuated. storm surge is causing a bayou to overflow. up to 5 feet of flooding is expected. in plaquemines parish, plans were put on hold till saturday to cut holes in a levee that overflowed causing homes to flood to their rooftops. the holes would relieve the pressure and allow the water to drain back into the mississippi and nearby marshes. 30 miles west of new orleans in laplace, entire subdivisions were evacuated when isaac's flood waters rushed in. >> a nightmare. >> reporter: the sudden tidal surge caught many people off guard. >> woke up it was fine. next minute it was like all over the place. we lost everything. everything. >> reporter: for many the flooding came up in a pitch black darkness of a night without power. now that the sun is up, many families like the frasiers here are havin
or a hurricane, they're getting ready. karen brown has more. >> reporter: police are patrolling the nearly deserted streets of new orleans' historic french quarter. homes and businesses are boarded up. sandbags are stacked and tens of thousands of gulf coast residents are getting out of town before isaac hits. it's expected late tonight or early tomorrow on the seventh anniversary of hurricane variety. this man and his family decided to evacuate this morning. >> we didn't want to stay and let katrina happen again. >> reporter: the 200-mile wide storm is gathering strength. it's expected to make landfall as a category one hurricane, bringing at least 75 mile per hour winds, 6 to 12-foot storm surges and up to 20 inches of rain in some places. >> it appears really to be right on the verge of becoming a hurricane. >> reporter: new orleans is not under a mandatory evacuation. president obama is urging people to play it safe. >> now is not the time to tempt faith. now is not the time to diiss official warnings. you need to take this seriously. >> reporter: after hurricane katrina, the u.s. gove
assassination attempt of congresswoman gabrielle giffords. karen brown reports. >> jarod lee loughner pleaded guilty tuesday to the 2011 shooting rampage that killed six people and wounded 13 others, including his intended target then congresswoman gabrielle giffords. a thinner expressionless loughner repeated i plead guilty 19 times, one for each count. >> mr. loughner will spend the remainder of his natural life in prison with no possibility of parole. >> a federal judge ruled that months of psychotropic medication and counseling to treat loughner's schizophrenia made him competent to stand trial and enter please. >> for some survivors it was little comfort. >> i'm glad he knows what he did. it doesn't change the facts. >> the plea deal spares jared loughner from the death penalty and spares the survivors and the victims' family from the pain of a lengthy trial. >> i grabbed him by throat and said don't move or i'll choke you. >> bill badger helped disarm loughner at the shooting scene in spite of his own injuries. he's relieved this is over. >> i just want him locked up so he's being punis
states of emergency. karen brown begins our coverage from key largo. >> reporter: fierce winds whipped through the florida keys, knocking down trees, while isaac's torrential rains caused some flooding in parts of south florida, but by sunday afternoon the dolphins were back out swimming and carol anderson was taking down her storm shutters. >> it was not as bad as i thought it would be. >> reporter: officials in key largo say 23,000 visitors left ahead of the store. even though the beaches remain empty they expect to be fully up and running for the lucrative labor day weekend. isaac is now headed northwest and forecasters say it could make landfall along the northern gulf coast midweek. louisiana's governor issued a state of emergency, and some low lying areas are already being evacuated. new orleans is on high alert. >> one of the things that we've learned here is to be prepared for the unexpected, and caution is always the better part of wisdom in these regards. >> reporter: hurricane warnings stretch from the florida panhandle to louisiana. on dauphin island in alabama, people are
louisiana, coastal mississippi. karen brown with cbs has the latest. >> reporter: the town outside new orleans is under as much as 12 feet of water after flooding topped an 18-mile stretch of levee. shrimp boat operators are rescuing some residents from their rooftops in plaquemines parish. the massive storm is turning slowly over land and showing no signings of losing strength. it's dumping almost an inch of rain an hour and pounding the gulf coast with steady 80 mile per hour winds. >> it will gradually weaken but that will take well into today or tonight to come down from hurricane status. >> reporter: some of the most intense weather hit new orleans at daybreak and they have about 3,000 of these police officers cruising the streets. they have the national guard actually embedded with the local police officers. you see part of the convoy going by right now. they are determining to keep law and order in this city as isaac moves through. long time new orleans resident ellis is glad to see the show of first. >> i think they're doing a great job. doing a great job. >> reporter: you feel
the gulf states. >> some areas are already under several feet of water and karen brown shows us that many who chose to ride out the storm are now awaiting rescue. she is out there braving the elements right now and joins us live from new orleans. >> they have had more than 10 in. of rain here in new orleans and we continue to get pounded. we have driven around the city and power lines are down, signs are down, trees are down, you can see the tree behind me. in the heart of the french quarter. further south where dozens of people have had to be rescued, in fact things are much worse. >> firefighters used axes to break through the roof of a home that was under water in louisiana. they pulled a man and his dog to safety. boats rescued dozens of people that were stranded on their rooftops after floodwaters came over and 18 mi. stretch of lesley outside of new orleans. the water was over 15 ft. high in one neighborhood. >> water is over the top of the roof. we had to break through the ceiling and go through the attic. >> the massive storm is turning slowly overland, pumping almost an inch of r
the area. >> water levels are dropping and landowners are worried. karen brown has more. >> reporter: even in the middal of a cornfield farmer harold grail is never without his blackberry. >> reporter: how has that changed your life? >> we will be able to consult everything with our telephones. >> reporter: in the blistering heat of his drought, he and his neighbors in the north plains of texas are going high-tech to conserve water. because the massive underground aquifer that iring gates their field has -- irrigates their field has seen a drop. to save the aquifer leon teaches that underground probes measure soil moisture and send messages to his computer. he only waters where it is needed. >> right now we are watering crops like this corn with half as much water. >> reporter: sprinklers are now closer to the ground. sensors monitor usage and send updates to his smartphone and some of his corn grows from hybrid seeds. the crop is high stakes and not just for the farmers. the texas high plains supply at least a quarter of the nation's beef. and even through the scorching drought the farme
in alabama and mississippi and louisiana. karen brown is in new orleans where people are bracing for isaac >> the national weather service is warning that life-threatening flooding is possible in the areas outside the city that are outside the levee protection system. those areas are under mandatory evacuation orders and a curfew is in place. we have been feeling the effects of isaac for hours now. flooding is the main concern rain is pelting the shoreline as the nearly 400 mi. wide hurricane begins its this low crawl on land >> 85-100 m.p.h. wind with 125 mi. per hour gusts is plenty big enough >> the massive storm could bring up to 20 in. of rain and a six- 12 ft. storm surge >> the hurricane has a little opportunity to strengthen but i would focus even more on the fact that it is a large hurricane and >> tens of thousands have already evacuated from louisiana, mississippi, alabama and florida. in new orleans there is not a mandatory evacuation order. in the french quarter, businesses are sandbagging and the streets are nearly deserted. flood walls are up. engineers have closed this floo
, florida, i'm karen brown. >>> gop officials in far a are scrambling to rework -- in tampa are scrambling to rework their convention center. tropical storm isaac forced the cancellation of monday's events. randall pinkston with the latest. >> reporter: workers are putting heavy barrels in place and setting up tents to keep gop delegates dry. even though monday's convention schedule has been postponed thousands in tampa are in for a wet and windy day. volunteer patricia chandler is taking the dark skies in stride. >> it's florida. we've been through a tropical stm already this summer. >> reporter: four days of convention speeches and events will have to be squeezed into just three. >> this hall was supposed to be full of delegates monday to nominate mitt romney. instead the gavel will come down and then the convention will immediately be suspended until tuesday. >> we are the 99%. >> reporter: anti-gop protesters got in some demonstrations before the wet weather arrived. this group brought their message of economic equality to the faith and freedom coalition's preconvention gathering. l
in this city until isaac passes. reporting live in new orleans i'm karen brown. back to you. >> zero doll rabbits for possible -- tolerance for possible looters. let's go to scott broom live from biloxi, mississippi tonight. what's the story there? >> reporter: tell you what, we're right in the midst of tropical storm storm force squall that's going through, a tornado warning just down the road from biloxi in gulf shores and so it's still rough. up and down the coast even over here in mississippi it's still rough as these lines of squalls related to this storm. as you can see they continue to pound this place. mississippi again is looking at flooding on the scale as they have in louisiana maybe up to 20 inches of rain before all of this is over. take a look at some of the pictures from here to downtown biloxi we shot a while ago. storm surge because of the persistent force of this storm and how slow it's within moving has come up here onto casino row in biloxi and has closed u.s. highway 90 in lots and lots of different locations. so this is the just a louisiana story. it's a mississippi
,000 are without power today and many people won't have electricity for several more days. karen brown, cbs news, reserve, louisiana. >> we should note downed power lines also a big problems in new orleans, but the brand-new levee system kept flooding to a minimum and in the wake of the devastation we're hearing countless stories of one amazing rescue after another. >> reporter: i'm scott broom in moss point, mississippi near pascagoula and nobody here thought a category 1 hurricane making landfall 160 miles way from here in another state would result in flooding like this. >> it's not a katrina. it's isaac. >> reporter: 20 inches of rain from a storm that simply will not leave. and now roberta turner's disabled mother betty is trapped. >> she has alzheimer's and i was really, really concerned about getting her out of there because i don't want nothing to happen to her. >> reporter: this was approximately the 200th rescue of the day. rescuers predict they'll be doing this for at least another 24 hours. >> areas that are flooded now, it's just going to get worse. >> we've been rolling all day.
gunman in the mass shooting in tucson, arizona, was back in court today. jared lautner. karen brown with the latest from the courthouse in tucson. >> reporter: a judge ruled that jared lautner is mentally competent to stand trial. he pled guilty. tv cameras were not allowed. lautner appeared very different. pale, thin, gaunt. he sat still as a psychiatrist testified about his troubled teenage and college years when he allegedly heard voices in his head. the psychiatrist said lautner told a doctor he was remorseful for what he did. lautner told his doctor, quote, i especially cry about the child. apparently referring to nine- year-old victim, christina green, who was killed in the attack. jared lautner's attorneys hope the plea agreement will get the 23-year-old college dropout life in prison instead of the death penalty. survivors of the shooting came to court, but former congressman woman, gabby giffords, was not one of them. mark kelly said he and his wife are satisfied with the plea agreement and avoiding a trial would help them and the rest of the community continue to recover
that wounded gabby giffords will spend the rest of his life behind bars. it's karen brown reporting. >> jared lee lofner pleaded guilty to the 2011 shooting rampage that killed six people and wounding 13 others, including his target, congresswoman gabby giffords. he repeated i plead guilty 19 times, one for each count. >> he will spend the remainder of his natural life in prison with no possibility of patrol. >> a federal judge ruled that months of medication and counseling to treat lofner's condition made his competent to stand trial and enter his employees. for some survivors -- his plea. for some survivors it was little kvrt. -- comfort. >> it doesn't change the fact. >> it spares him in the death penalty and spares the survivors and victim's families from the pain of a lengthy trial. >> i grabbed him by the throat like this. i said don't move or i'll choke you. >> bill badger helped disarm lofner at the shooting scene in spite of his own injuries. he said he's relieved this is over. >> i just want him locked up so he is pg punished for what he did, so he can never do anything like that
in decades. it's taking a toll. karen brown reports for wjz, from the in mississippi river. >>> chad clark and his crew are checking the nuts and bolts as their barge squeezes through the narrow spots on the mississippi river. here in memphis, the drought followed through the mississippi river. for captain roy daniels, dodging exposed sandbars can be like threading a needle. >> i want to make sure to be right. so we don't have an incident or hit aground. >> the river is a super highway for the nation's commodity. barges transport 60% of our corn and 20% of our coal for export. >> reporter: one barge can move as much as 70 trucks. >> everything depends on the river being open. >> reporter: derek smith of the army corps of engineers helps keep traffic moving. >> in high stages, tugboats are alike on the freeway. all by themselves. you can move them wherever you want. in low risk maneuvers, to boats are basic ole -- are basically on a one-way street. >> reporter: barges are moving slower and carrying less cargo. >> if you were heavier, you would sort of scrape the bottom? >> yes, ma'am. >> re
years after katrina wiped out new orleans, hurricane isaac is banging on the door again. karen brown is in new orleans, it is raining there, no one is out, please tell me that people have evacuated and are following the orders of the state? >> i can tell you that just in the past hour these conditions have definitely deteriorated. it is blowing so hard that it hurts when it hits you. we have yet to see people out here in quite some time, the mayor urges everyone to stay indoors, at this hour, they have more than 3000 law enforcement personnel on the streets right now, including national guard members. they want to keep law and order as this storm is just expected to get worse throughout the night .. >> certainly new orleans is much better prepared this time around for any kind of hurricane? >> yes, you know, they spend $14 billion, the federal government did, to rebuild the levee system and the storm more protection system. there's a 200 mi. barrier around the city that they hope will hold up. i'm sorry we're getting such big wind gusts. tonight the biggest concern is the areas outsi
. many areas are still flooded and levees in danger of collapse. karen brown shows us the damage. >> thousands of people packed up their cars, and evacuated towns along a river near the louisiana/mississippi border, where a dam is in danger of breaking. local officials say there's a 50/50 chance that the dam will fail. south of new orleans, flood waters left cow stranded on the front porch of a home, a man in a boat tried to herd them to safety. crews cut holes in a nearby levee to relieve pressure and allow the water to drain back into the mississippi and nearby marshes. entire subdivisions are evacuated after the flood waters rushed in. the rescue effort continued today as the coast guard used a helicopter to lift a family from their flooded homes. in nearby reserve louisiana entire neighborhoods remain under water after trying to evacuate in the middle of the night. and some families have come back to see what is left, and it could be days before the water starts to recede. >> this is worse than katrina to us. >> they used a boat to take their neighbors to dry land. >> a lot o
new orleans and president obama will be in louisiana monday. karen brown is in the gulf coast town of brathway. >> reporter: they had more than 144 water rescues here and the search and rescue operation continue. we got out in a boat in that neighborhood you see here behind me and what we saw was absolutely heartbreaking. cisco gonzalez returned to a home in brathway today where two of his neighbors were found dead. >> it's a very sad moment because the people that lived there, one of them was handicapped. >> reporter: gonzalez helped rescue dozens from his community even though his home was under water. >> we thought we were say. >> reporter: streets still look like canals in this hard hit town south of new orleans. the floodwaters are slowly receding because the plaquemines parish levee was intentionally breached to drain the area, but a helicopter view shows in homes and businesses are still under water. here at cisco gonzalez's house the water came all the way up to his porch. now it's receding down his staircase. authorities are punching more holes in the levee in hopes of
this drought and rebuild in better times. karen brown, cbs news, arkansas. >>> in wetter news, a tropical depression has formed in the atlantic east of the caribbean. forecasters at the national hurricane center in miami say it could strengthen to become a named tropical storm later today. storm watches are posted for the windward islands. up next on your thursday morning, your weather forecast and in sports, we'll wrap up wednesday's results at the london olympics. plus, the president's message to u.s. women gymnasts on winning the team gold. maybe you can't. when you have migraines with fifteen or more headache days a month, you miss out on your life. you may have chronic migraine. go to mychronicmigraine.com to find a headache specialist. and don't live a maybe life. boost your training routine with an avocado kick. it's a game changer. [ male announcer ] so is the tasty turkey avocado. tender turkey breast and smooth avocado on freshly baked 9 grain wheat bread. just sounds good doesn't it? i'm lapping it up. [ male announcer ] try it in the ultimate veggie. fresh veggies with super f
in the tucson arizona shooting that injured congresswoman giffords pleads guilty in court. as karen brown reports for wjz a judge first had to rule that laughner was mentally competent for trial. >> reporter: minutes later laughner pled guilty in the case. tv cameras were not allowed in the court. laughner appeared very different than his booking photo. pail, thin, gaunt. he sat still as a court appointed psychologists testified about his troubled teenage and college years when he allegedly heard voices in his head and made suicidal comments. the psychiatrist said laughner told a doctor he was remorseful for what he did. he said laughner told his doctor, quote i especially cry about the child. laughner's attorney says that he hopes the plea agreement will give the college drop out a life in prison instead of death. survivors of the shooting came to court, but giffords was not among them. kelly said that he and giffords were satisfied with the court's ruling. >>> since last year laughner has been kept in a psychiatric hospital in missouri. >>> some new information about a disturbing story
, they're looking at another 4 to 8 inches of rain. >> karen brown is live with the latest from mourns. >> reporter: so far in new orleans the 200-mile storm protection perimeter is still holding but right now there is flooding in one community. they say the current of the storm surge is so strong they can't even get in to help people. further south things are even worse.
dumping lot of rain creating big time problems. karen brown picks up the story from reserve, louisiana. >> reporter: thousands of people packed up their cars and evacuated towns along a river near the louisiana/mississippi border where a dam is in danger of breaking. local officials say there's a 50/50 chance the dam will fail at lake tangipahoa. in plaquemines parish south of ne
in maryland. it is up a month ago. but down last year when prices hit $3.70 a galton. -- gallon. >>> karen brown reports for wjz from arkansas. where ranchers are being forced to sell cattle at rock bottom prices. >> reporter: del has been selling cattle his whole life, with love and pride. >> you see them every day. just like a grandchild, basically. >> which is why he's breaking his heart to go. >> 234. how many do you have left? >> well, i've got 112. >> the drought has killed the grass and forced pruit to start using up expensive winter hay. says he's selling off cattle. >> it's just a hard feeling. you know they'll be better off down the road, where there will be plenty of grass for them. >> reporter: at the arkansas cattle auction, it's a buyer's market. owner randy goodman is selling twice as many cows as usual. and they're going for a third less than the normal price. >> i'll have those cattle. and that's sad. >> the lucky ones find homes in states. gerald drove 260 miles from oklahoma. when he waves his card, it means he's bidding. >> did just buy cattle? >> yes. >> did you get a
but it is still causing problems. karen brown is in new orleans with the latest, we tried to talk to you last night. we lost our connection with you and i wonder if you could tell me the difference between last night's storm and tonight. you are dry? >> you know, we have had all sorts of emotions from this storm of the one thing it will not do is go away. it has just been going since we last spoke. last night the wind was blowing so hard that it was like needles hitting you in tonights it is just a steady downpour which is what is bad news for the flooding situation because not only to they have a 10 ft. storm surge coming in but all this rain, more than a foot total. so there are neighborhoods that are being flooded as we speak, there are rescue operations going on, so this is a developing situation throughout the night. >> a lot of people did not heed the warning to evacuate. >> yes, you know, part of that is heartbreaking on some many levels. but in that area to the south, that was flooded, where more than 75 people had to be rescued from their rooftops, they were under mandatory evacuatio
passed, his city will move immediately into search and rescue mode. i'm karen brown, back to you. >> we are hoping there's not much searching and rescuing to be done. though we don't know yet. topper shutt is here in the weather center. more rain event than a wind event. you have been saying that all along. where is isaac now? >> it is 105 miles southeast of new orleans. we have reports of bowie, essentially at the mouth of the mississippi. 83-mile per hour wind gusts sustained at 63. this is the satellite picture, a little better organized. it's still offshore and it's going to be tough to tell you when it makes land fall. it is over land, but half of it is also water. this is pretty well organized storm. still do not have a defined eye. tropical storm force winds extend out of the center, 180 miles. so, you know, even though we talk about the eye making land fall. here's the track. they still bring it on as a category one, which is good. late tonight, early tomorrow. take it right through louisiana. it's going to be a big water problem there. 10 inches of rain, 15 inches of rain pos
important waterway. karen brown took a ride on the mighty mississippi where water levels are becoming a serious threat to the economy. >> reporter: clad clark and his crew are checking the nuts and bolts as their barge squeezes through the narrow spot on the mississippi water. here in memphis the drought followed a dry winter and the mighty mississippi is more than 10 feet below normal. for captain roy daniels dodging exposed sandbars can be like threading a needle. >> i want to make sure to be right so we don't have an incident or get aground. >> reporter: the river is a super highway for the nation's commodities, barges transport 60% of our corn and 20% of our coal for export. one barge can move as much as 70 trucks. >> everything depends on the river being open. >> reporter: derek smith of the army corps of engineers helped keep traffic moving. >> in high stages towboats are like on a freeway all by themselves. you can maneuver anywhere you want. in low rivers or stages like today towboats are basically on a one-way street. >> reporter: the army corps dredges the trouble spots
to lose. reporting live in new orleans i'm karen brown. back to you. >> we'll check in now with meteorologist topper shutt in the weather center and, top, isaac doesn't team to be mything very much. >> he's creeping -- moving very much. >> he's creeping along. established winds are 70 miles per hour. the location of the storm is about 60 miles west of new orleans or if you prefer about, 35 miles south of baton rouge. he's been a tropical storm about three hours now and still wind gusts to 80, that's still a strong healthy storm. it will move away through sections of arkansas and eventually accelerate once it gets into missouri and into the midwest and yes, this could impact our weather getting into the holiday weekend, but it's not moving very fast very far. even friday at 1:00 it's still in the state of arkansas. massive bands continue to circulate around the storm not moving very far very fast. it's going to actually threaten portions of northeast texas before it's all said and done. 53 mile-per-hour wind in new orleans, 39 mile-per-hour winds north and a 47 mile-per-hou
Search Results 0 to 34 of about 35 (some duplicates have been removed)

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